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Collection: MicroGreens - Loaded with Nutrients!

 

Note: Sales are local to the Tri-City area Mission, Abbotsford, Surrey, Langley, Maple Ridge (and possibly Vancouver for large orders) due to the need to keep the product fresh from us to you! 

If you are uncertain, contact us prior to ordering to avoid disappointment.

 

Microgreens are vegetable greens (not to be confused with sprouts or shoots) harvested just after the cotyledon*1 leaves have developed (and possibly with one set of true leaves). They are grown or purchased by people focused on nutrition, or else are used as both a visual and flavor component, primarily in fine dining restaurants. Chefs use colorful microgreens to enhance the attractiveness and taste of their dishes with distinct delicate textures and unique flavors, such as sweet and spicy. Microgreens are smaller than “baby greens” (e.g. spinach, kale, arugula, radicchio), but harvested later than sprouts (e.g. broccoli, mung bean, soya bean, wheat, and sunflower). Among upscale grocers, they are now considered a specialty genre of greens, good for garnishing salads, soups, sandwiches, and plates.



 

Edible young greens are produced from various kinds of vegetables, herbs, or other plants. They range in size from 1 to 3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm), including the stem and leaves. The stem is cut just above the soil line during harvesting. Microgreens have fully developed cotyledon leaves and usually one pair of very small, partially developed true leaves. The average crop-time for most microgreens is 10–14 days from seeding to harvest.

*1 A cotyledon (/ˌkɒtɪˈliːdən/; "seed leaf" from Latin cotyledon,[1] from Greek: κοτυληδών kotylēdōn, gen.: κοτυληδόνος kotylēdonos, from κοτύλη kotýlē "cup, bowl") is a significant part of the embryo within the seed of a plant, and is defined as "the embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plants, one or more of which are the first to appear from a germinating seed."[2] The number of cotyledons present is one characteristic used by botanists to classify the flowering plants (angiosperms). Species with one cotyledon are called monocotyledonous ("monocots"). Plants with two embryonic leaves are termed dicotyledonous ("dicots").

 

 Harvesting Microgreens

 By Peggy Greb - http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/jan14/d3085-1.htm, Public Domain, Link

 

Note: Sales are local to the Tri-City area Mission, Abbotsford, Surrey, Langley, Maple Ridge (and possibly Vancouver for large orders) due to the need to keep the product fresh from us to you! 

If you are uncertain, contact us prior to ordering to avoid disappointment.

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